What Windows 8 Could Mean For Brand Advertizing

What Windows 8 Could Mean For Brand Advertizing

November 13th, 2012

The Windows 8 overhaul is the most dramatic change to the Windows interface since Microsoft brought out Windows 95. Though some traditional desktop components remain available on the new Windows 8, the platform has been designed to be scalable across desktop, tablet, and mobile devices, meaning that it could be easier than ever for brands to have a massively cross-platform strategy. The Drum reports on some of the new features, and what that could mean for brands.

 

 
With Windows 8 designed to provide a consistent experience on whatever device it is being used, this is a convergence beyond what we’ve seen from Apple or other companies to date. The advantage Microsoft hope to gain is once someone has an app on one device, it will work on any other, and sync together. This all bodes well for brands wanting to take advantage of what Windows 8 has to offer, and those that can get apps out quickly will find they have a significant early-mover advantage. 
 
Very encouragingly, the advertising environment has been well thought through and ad placement in Windows 8 apps is well integrated, robust and seamless. It presents a world of opportunity for advertisers, and re-imagines what integrated ads really can do. Using HTML5, developers have the ability to dynamically and seamlessly thread ads through app content. These HTML5 ads can lead users to an interactive full-screen experience, and support animation, sound and interactivity.
 
Windows 8 is not just another operating system release from Microsoft. It is a total change to the user interface and introduces an entirely new type of software. The main interface is a “Start screen” full of apps, displayed as live tiles that are continuously updated with dynamic information. Brands and their agencies need to learn how to design digital products for the Modern User Interface; they need to stop thinking icons and ‘desktop’ and start thinking ‘app’.
 
As someone who has used the new Window 8 user interface, I'm excited to see how it can be leveraged for marketing purposes. Though the redesign is a departure from anything we've seen thus far in the world of desktop operating systems, the app integration could be a really excellent opportunity for brands to pioneer entirely new ways of marketing to the desktop community.
 
What do you think? Have you used a Windows 8 computer? Is your brand ready to explore the new ecosystem?

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