Content Map for Customer Satisfaction

Content Map for Customer Satisfaction

March 11th, 2013
happy customer

In an age when customers have more choices, more control, more ways to connect, and more access information, the customer should always be at the center of every marketing effort. However, many marketers have gotten so caught up in the creation of content that they have forgotten how important it is to match marketing content with the customer buying journey and lifecycle.

As we all know, keeping a customer is more cost effective and profitable than acquiring a new customer; MarketingProfs lays out the buying journey and the customer lifecycle for content creation. One common definition of customer lifecycle is "the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using, and maintaining loyalty to a product or service." Capturing potential and existing customers' attention, preference, purchase, and loyalty is a key component of providing content in the customer lifecycle.
 
The purpose of content marketing is to deliver high-quality, relevant, and valuable information to prospects and customers. Delivering this in the right channel at the right time drives profitable customer action. Mapping content to multiple buying journeys and life cycles is an important part of this strategy.
 
When you draw up your map, be sure to include input from your internal staffers who are in contact with customers, as well contacting the customers themselves. MarketingProfs recommends you take the following into account:
  • Initial triggers that lead to first contact
  • Steps they take (industry reports, product reports and reviews, whitepapers, demos, etc.) and the conversations (analysts, colleagues, event encounters, call centers, salespeople, etc.) they engage in to solve their problem and find a specific solution
  • Steps and experiences leading up to their purchase (the RFP, reference calls, pilots, etc.)
  • Steps associated with the purchase and consumption (the onboarding process, purchasing processes, implementation, invoicing, etc.)
  • Ongoing experience and reaction to their purchase (problem resolution process, new product offers, community participation opportunities, etc.)
 
Once you've mapped the process and organized each step into the appropriate stage, you can begin to match marketing content with the buying process and lifecycle.
 
If you've mapped out your content properly, the links between marketing activities, content, and the customer buying process and lifecycle will become clear when you've completed the process. 
 

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